Recce Movement

Started by Big Insect, 22 June 2022, 04:56:03 PM

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Big Insect

22 June 2022, 04:56:03 PM Last Edit: 22 June 2022, 05:04:28 PM by Big Insect
I've had a few questions (off-forum) about how Recce movement should be played.

I quote from Superscribes game reports as well to illustrate the challenge very eloquently:

"Recce movement – 1D6 is thrown in initiative phase to determine how far they can move in the command phase.  We understand they can move at any time in the command phase before the CO throws a command order? 
> that is correct Chris
We played BRDM-2 (move 20cm) which threw a 5.  Player opted to initially move 40cm at beginning of command phase (2 x 20cm) so dice was adjusted to 3.  Later in command phase after nearby units had moved, the recce moved another 20cm and a suppression marker was then placed as he had no plans to move any further. 
The rules say to use a dice 'to keep track of the movement available' which suggests that recce can split movement like this, or must they do all movement in one go? The rules may need a tweak to clarify this.
"

Having re-read the section in the rules (which is almost word for word the same as the Recce section in BKCIV as well) I can see the way that what I have written can be interpreted both ways.
My original intention had been that the Recce unit could only make a single continuous move (other than for when it was under-fire, when that move was in effect suspended, until shooting had been resolved, and if it was not suppressed it continued on its way). However, the way that Superscript (Chris) and partners interpreted the rules in their test game, actually works out far better than I'd imagined. I think that the Recce making choices as it moves across the table about whether it is going to move forward, depending upon circumstances, works well.

The one caveat I would add to this is that I think it is sensible (& avoids 'gamey' behaviour) if each movement stage/step is classified as a full moves e.g. if a Recce unit has a move of 20cm and has rolled a 3 to move - so has a maximum of 60cm movement - it must move in lots of 3 x 20cm. If it stops at 30cms initially (for example) - it will only be able to move a remaining maximum of 20cm during the final move step.
This will stop players moving in many small increments and thus keeps the game flowing.

Putting the move indicator dice next to the Recce unit becomes even more important playing it this way, as does ensuring that the dice is adjusted to reflect how far the unit has moved. So in our example, the Recce unit starts with a score of 3 on the d:6 marker, it moves 30cm and stops, so the dice is now adjusted down to a score of 1 (as it has used up 1 full 20cm move and part of the 2nd, but has 1 full 20cm left to move).
Likewise, placing the suppression marker on the Recce when all movement has completed indicates to your opponent that you've stopped moving forwards.

I will adjust the Recce Movement section in the rules to better articulate the above, once we are out of the Errata phase and edits are being done, but for now please use the method as described above.

Thank you Chris & team ... good play-test insight.

Mark
'He could have lived a risk-free, moneyed life, but he preferred to whittle away his fortune on warfare.' Xenophon, The Anabasis

This communication has been written by a dyslexic person. If you have any trouble with the meaning of any of the sentences or words, please do not be afraid to ask for clarification. Remember that dyslexics are often high-level conceptualisers who provide "out of the box" thinking.

Steve J

That explains things rather nicely :) .
http://wwiiwargaming.blogspot.co.uk/

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Big Insect

'He could have lived a risk-free, moneyed life, but he preferred to whittle away his fortune on warfare.' Xenophon, The Anabasis

This communication has been written by a dyslexic person. If you have any trouble with the meaning of any of the sentences or words, please do not be afraid to ask for clarification. Remember that dyslexics are often high-level conceptualisers who provide "out of the box" thinking.

Superscribe