Panic buying of petrol

Started by Steve J, 25 September 2021, 07:49:37 AM

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FierceKitty

It's the garnish of tin dust and powdered saffron that makes the real ones special.
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Heedless Horseman

Quote from: FierceKitty on 13 October 2021, 01:05:36 AM
It's the garnish of tin dust and powdered saffron that makes the real ones special.
'saffron'?
(40 Yrs ago. I should have been an Angry Young Man... but wasn't.
Now... I am an Old B******! )  ;)

Ithoriel

Saffron from the hevva buns maybe? A rare treat my gran whipped up from time to time as a change from scones, clotted cream and strawberry jam.
Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

FierceKitty

Traditional Cornish flavouring. May reflect Phoenecian influence, I'm told.
I have not the pleasure of understanding you. Of what are you talking?

Heedless Horseman

Quote from: FierceKitty on 13 October 2021, 04:07:15 AM
Traditional Cornish flavouring. May reflect Phoenecian influence, I'm told.
Curious? How could Cornish afford Saffron? I thought that until 'present', it was an 'ultimate Luxury' commodity? I don't even know what it tastes like!   ;D
(40 Yrs ago. I should have been an Angry Young Man... but wasn't.
Now... I am an Old B******! )  ;)

flamingpig0

Quote from: steve_holmes_11 on 12 October 2021, 09:57:48 AM
If so, are the Kitten Drowners Irregular A?



Yes, and they are triple armed LMI who can form wedge
"I like coffee exceedingly..."
 H.P. Lovecraft

"We don't want your stupid tanks!"
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FierceKitty

Quote from: Heedless Horseman on 13 October 2021, 04:41:52 AM
Curious? How could Cornish afford Saffron? I thought that until 'present', it was an 'ultimate Luxury' commodity? I don't even know what it tastes like!   ;D

Do yourself a favour and find out with the aid of a reliable chef or cookbook. It's a must in fish stews, pilaos, and the better types of kebab. As for the price, it's a luxury, but bear in mind that the Irish used it to colour their clothes in the dark ages.
I have not the pleasure of understanding you. Of what are you talking?

Heedless Horseman

13 October 2021, 07:03:52 AM #247 Last Edit: 13 October 2021, 07:14:33 AM by Heedless Horseman
Sheesh! If Irish used Saffron for a cloth dye, that is a LOT of Crocus sepals for an impoverisfhed country.... maybe a 'colour' rather than a commodity?
I suppose I will have to buy a jar... just ti see what it tastes like!
My cullinary exploration is salt/ pepper, Maggi Seasoning..or 'Itallian Seasoning' for cheese on toast!

Thanks, anyway.  :)
(40 Yrs ago. I should have been an Angry Young Man... but wasn't.
Now... I am an Old B******! )  ;)

FierceKitty

You buy it in milligrams, not in jars! Heavens, Bill Gates doesn't buy it by the jar!

If you're not sure what to do with it, ask around for a good Italian, Turkish, or Indian restaurant. Might be a costly experiment otherwise.
I have not the pleasure of understanding you. Of what are you talking?

Techno II

Quote from: Ithoriel on 12 October 2021, 04:14:37 PM
700 grams of Kenyan Lemon Chilli Chevda just delivered.

I blame you Mr. Lewis, I blame you! :D :D :D

No problems, Mike !  :D
But has it got the curried 'rice crispies' ?

Cheers - Phil. :)

Heedless Horseman

13 October 2021, 07:48:13 AM #250 Last Edit: 13 October 2021, 07:52:06 AM by Heedless Horseman
Quote from: FierceKitty on 13 October 2021, 07:29:09 AM
You buy it in milligrams, not in jars! Heavens, Bill Gates doesn't buy it by the jar!

If you're not sure what to do with it, ask around for a good Italian, Turkish, or Indian restaurant. Might be a costly experiment otherwise.
Thanks for that... you have probably made a Tesco shelf stacker's day just a little bit less Horrendous!  :d :d :d
(40 Yrs ago. I should have been an Angry Young Man... but wasn't.
Now... I am an Old B******! )  ;)

mmcv

Quote from: FierceKitty on 13 October 2021, 07:29:09 AM
You buy it in milligrams, not in jars! Heavens, Bill Gates doesn't buy it by the jar!

If you're not sure what to do with it, ask around for a good Italian, Turkish, or Indian restaurant. Might be a costly experiment otherwise.

Technically it does come in a small spice jar in a lot of supermarkets, just to add further confusion. Though obviously, you don't get much in it. A little goes a long way. I used it most recently with some Spanish dishes like paella.

Rice is probably a good way to get a sense of the flavour without it being overpowered by other ingredients. Little onion, garlic softened in olive oil, then the rice, some stock and saffron towards the end and serve up with whatever you fancy. Alternatively adding a little white wine and using some arborio rice and some gentle stirring as you add the stock a ladle at a time would make a nice risotto too. Some shellfish wouldn't go amiss in there either.

You could even infuse the saffron in a bit of milk and add it to mash.

FierceKitty

13 October 2021, 11:19:50 AM #252 Last Edit: 13 October 2021, 11:25:34 AM by FierceKitty
Actually, an easy way to appreciate it is in a lassi. Whip up some plain yoghurt with cold water in a blender and add sugar to taste, with the saffron ground to a powder in the sugar.
I have not the pleasure of understanding you. Of what are you talking?

Gwydion

Quote from: Heedless Horseman on 13 October 2021, 07:03:52 AM
Sheesh! If Irish used Saffron for a cloth dye, that is a LOT of Crocus sepals for an impoverisfhed country.... maybe a 'colour' rather than a commodity?

Yep - no Crocus involved - Weld from Dyer's Weed which the Irish called Buídhe Mór (Great Yellow).

[we've wandered a long way from petrol - the village station ran out at the weekend, so still some 'patchiness' in Wales]

Heedless Horseman

Thanks for that,, Gwydion.
Back to petrol...
No shortage in NE UK. But have noticed more cars  driving on electric.
In two minds about electric.... less traffic noise... good... but you can't hear the things coming... bad.
(40 Yrs ago. I should have been an Angry Young Man... but wasn't.
Now... I am an Old B******! )  ;)