How to conduct a Platoon attack.

Started by Last Hussar, 02 January 2021, 04:23:13 PM

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holdfast

The advantage of putting any sort of 2" mortar round into a house was of course that White Phosphorous was a bit dangerous, so it didn't really matter whether it was HE or smoke that you used.

Lord Kermit of Birkenhead

Doing a house clearing exercise I asked the DS why we didn't use smoke inside the house, he demonstrated with a coulored one - you choke.
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holdfast

The problem with Brits and cricket is that no military situation can be described without a cricketing reference. In a NATO HQ in the Balkans I had to beg the Brits to stop referring to Sticky Wickets, fading light, out for a duck and bowling from the gasworks end and tell them just to say what was actually happening in words of as few syllables as possible.

mollinary

Quote from: holdfast on 12 February 2021, 05:55:20 PM
The problem with Brits and cricket is that no military situation can be described without a cricketing reference. In a NATO HQ in the Balkans I had to beg the Brits to stop referring to Sticky Wickets, fading light, out for a duck and bowling from the gasworks end and tell them just to say what was actually happening in words of as few syllables as possible.

If I recall correctly, you missed out "putting them on the back foot", "that was a bit of a googly". and "swinging it both ways".    On second thoughts, perhaps the last one had another meaning which escaped me at the time?
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Westmarcher

Doesn't that last one also have an equivalent in the field of electricity?*

Anyhoo, was it the use of cricket jargon by a British commander (29th Brigade?) in Korea (Imjin River?) that made the U.S. division think the situation wasn't as serious as it actually was?

p.s. Never mind foreigners being confused - I'm a Brit but also a Scotsman ...

* AC/DC
I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.

steve_holmes_11

Quote from: holdfast on 12 February 2021, 05:55:20 PM
The problem with Brits and cricket is that no military situation can be described without a cricketing reference. In a NATO HQ in the Balkans I had to beg the Brits to stop referring to Sticky Wickets, fading light, out for a duck and bowling from the gasworks end and tell them just to say what was actually happening in words of as few syllables as possible.

You can't be too careful with Johnny Foreigner sniffing about.

steve_holmes_11

Quote from: mollinary on 12 February 2021, 06:37:13 PM
If I recall correctly, you missed out "putting them on the back foot", "that was a bit of a googly". and "swinging it both ways".    On second thoughts, perhaps the last one had another meaning which escaped me at the time?

Not to mention: "Trying to get his leg over".

Raider4

Quote from: holdfast on 12 February 2021, 05:55:20 PM
The problem with Brits and cricket is that no military situation can be described without a cricketing reference. In a NATO HQ in the Balkans I had to beg the Brits to stop referring to Sticky Wickets, fading light, out for a duck and bowling from the gasworks end and tell them just to say what was actually happening in words of as few syllables as possible.

That's cos you were talking to the ruperts. Try talking to people who actually work for a living.
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Last Hussar

Quote from: holdfast on 12 February 2021, 05:55:20 PM
The problem with Brits and cricket is that no military situation can be described without a cricketing reference. In a NATO HQ in the Balkans I had to beg the Brits to stop referring to Sticky Wickets, fading light, out for a duck and bowling from the gasworks end and tell them just to say what was actually happening in words of as few syllables as possible.

It's not our fault you don't speak English.
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steve_holmes_11

Quote from: Last Hussar on 12 February 2021, 11:36:55 PM
It's not our fault you don't speak English.

I say; IT'S NOT OUR FAULT <pause> YOU CAN'T SPEAK ENGLISH!!!!


<Shrugs>

Who's a chap got to threaten with the Webley to get a proper cup of tea around here.

paulr

During a break on a course in the US I was asked by one of the staff running the course how it was going

Without thinking I replied, "Not bad"

Much panic ensued as they tried to work out what they needed to do to improve delivery of the course :o

I then explained that in New Zealand 'not bad' means good or in America very good ;D
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holdfast

That's cos you were talking to the ruperts. Try talking to people who actually work for a living.

In my experience in the 1980s the young officers were actually better than they thought they were, and in several cases the sergeants weren't as good as they thought they were.

Raider4

Quote from: holdfast on 14 February 2021, 12:09:57 PM
In my experience in the 1980s the young officers were actually better than they thought they were, and in several cases the sergeants weren't as good as they thought they were.

Oh, I don't doubt it. Sorry, wasn't denigrating anyone in any way.

Just that the people using cricketing terms were going to be the officers.
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