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| | |-+  Advice on 10mm Undercoating
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Author Topic: Advice on 10mm Undercoating  (Read 7234 times)
FierceKitty
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« Reply #15 on: 21 May 2010, 06:28:46 AM »

The Gemahlpo (Teutophiles can work it out) will be breaking my door down too. Though I used to use black undercoats when I was a 15mm man, I prefer white in 10mm. I find it's easier to get a bright, clear, even coat of pigment over it. This may well have something to do with my ageing eyes, and I don't pretend to paint as well as some can.
   What the hell, Tokugawa Ieyasu was wounded in action at 73, wasn't he?
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goat major
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« Reply #16 on: 21 May 2010, 08:04:26 AM »

I always do highlights and I do think it works, but as Clib said you do need to get a strong contrast. On 28mm figures i would use 3+ colours but on 10mm i tend to use 2 - a shade colour and a highlight colour (skipping the mid-tone). I only tend to use washes on flesh and fur - but still supplement with a highlight. Of course this does take time (which partly removes one of the advantages of 10mm!)
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goat major
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« Reply #17 on: 21 May 2010, 08:06:36 AM »

i like this thought. There's a similar technique on the Citadel painting book - i think they call it a guide wash. Its got to be worth an experiment i think.
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sixsideddice
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« Reply #18 on: 21 May 2010, 08:07:23 AM »

hehe, maybe he`ll rise from Nikkō Tōshō-gū and come haunt us  Smiley

Oh my, all these great ideas, and I just don`t know what to do.

Basically, I used to paint a lot in 25/28mm. So much so, the very thought of how many minis I`ve painted over the years scares the heck out of me now (over 25000 I`m guessing); and then I got lazy, and started painting for the table - just passable standard. But since taking up 10mm and seeing just what CAN be done with these marvellous little guys, I`ve become determined not to let the team down if I can help it... so want to make a decent attempt to get this right lol.

My 10mm fantasy figures are passable, perhaps, in a bad light after a few drinks. But I`m painting 10mm English Civil War(s), Monmouth Rebellion and Jacobite wars from scratch, so have an opportunity to do good (there`s always something really nice about starting from the beginning with a new era. Clean metal, and good intensions – gamers`bliss).

Hmmmm, well I went out and bought a can of matt black undercoat spray yesterday, so will try in out on the London Argyll Militia first and see how that works out for me; if it’s a disaster, I`ll slink back to white undercoating and take it from there.

I`ll post the photo results when the first Foot are ready for action.


Cheers guys

Steve
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FierceKitty
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« Reply #19 on: 21 May 2010, 02:39:12 PM »

I wish someone would produce tartan paint for ECW highlanders!
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goat major
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« Reply #20 on: 21 May 2010, 02:57:42 PM »

I wish someone would produce tartan paint for ECW highlanders!

It only tends to come in large tins - for 10mm you need to decant it into a smaller container first and then it works fine.
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Grenadier
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« Reply #21 on: 21 May 2010, 11:09:07 PM »

 OK, I'll put in my two cents to muddy the topic.  I use white or light gray Tamiya spray as it is probably the best primer in spray bomb form.  It covers extremely well and doesn't fill in details.  After drying I apply my first black-gray wash.  This not only provides much needed pre-shading but pops out the details thus allowing my 40+ year old eyes to see what to paint! Color blocking follows in order of flesh, clothing, cuffs, lapels and turnbacks, equipment, hair.  This step is often back and forth as my clumsy fingers paint what they shouldn't.  After drying, a second wash of black-gray for clothing and equipment and a wash of russet for skin. Light highlights as usual and then a spray bomb job of matt acrylic art spray to seal and protect from greasy gamer fingers!

Brian
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Jubilation T Cornpone
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« Reply #22 on: 23 May 2010, 07:15:10 AM »

Always a black undercoat with a highlight of GW Khemri Brown. Works for me. Everyone has a different way of doing things. Experiment and then go with what works for you.
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sixsideddice
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« Reply #23 on: 24 May 2010, 12:25:47 PM »

Just to update,

My 10mm ECW  parcel arrived in the post today, so now I`m well and truly in business and can begin the long process of working to get them to the table in all their glory.

They really are exquisitely detailed and I`m utterly impressed. Makes working on them so much easier when they look so stunning  to begin with... and absolutely no flash or uneven bases to have to deal with - incredible.

I will stick, I think, with Foundry Publication’s 1644 rules (just need to convert inches to centimetres), as they have such a great skirmish feel to them, and will allow me to base the pieces individually (on 1 cent coins); which I always think brings a personal `hands on` appeal to the table... something which is sometimes missing in this scale, I feel.

Thanks guys for all your advice about undercoating, it’s all sunk in; now I just have to put it into practise...  wish me luck :-)

Steve
« Last Edit: 24 May 2010, 12:30:49 PM by sixsideddice » Logged

Wkeyser
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« Reply #24 on: 25 May 2010, 09:19:20 AM »

I am also a whity Smiley  I prime white for a couple of reasons the first is that I use predominantly Windsor and Newton Acrylics. This allows me to thin them to varying degrees which affects the way the fig looks. This allows me in one coat of paint to shade and highlight at the same time. This does mean that I often have to go back and reprime. For example once the coats are done I have to go back and reprime white the belts, packs etc. The other benefit of the Windsor and Newton allows you have a matt look (by thinning a lot) to a semi gloss look (very little thinning of the paint).

Also what I see with most black primed figs is a darkening of the colors and lots of black lines, something you just don’t see in reality. I know that we are painting to accentuate details but I just don’t like the look of heavy black lines and worse are the black eyes you see often when figs have been primed with black.

William

The coat on these French are done in one coat no shading or highlighting, by using white primer and a thinned acrlyc paint.

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sixsideddice
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« Reply #25 on: 25 May 2010, 05:39:03 PM »

Really really nice Wkeyser , highly impressive.

Wow, you use Windsor and Newton; thats so cool, I really like their Inks.

Here are a few of my Ink efforts  Smiley

http://tabletoptitans.com/tutorials/0001.php

http://tabletoptitans.com/reviews/0001.php


Steve
« Last Edit: 25 May 2010, 05:41:58 PM by sixsideddice » Logged

Last Hussar
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« Reply #26 on: 31 May 2010, 11:49:18 AM »

I go black - I find if I use white or grey if I mis a bit it really shows up. (and its always after I base and the spot is visible but inaccessible!).  I find GW Foundation paints are excellent for coverage, even over black - the Mechanite red only needs ONE coat, the only red I know that does this.

I tend to block paint, because I don't have the skill for the fiddly bits.  There is also what I call my '3 foot factor' (aka table distance)

I have some 6mm that I bought painted, and on some of the French foriegn regiments  they have all the lace and stuff- trouble is from 4 feet away they look like a Jackson Pollock - just a mess of colour.   I must admit I don't do buttons etc - often invisible from the other side of the table.

Remember in 10mm, 1mm on the figure is 6 inches (make your own joke about what you tell your missus!).  I sometimes do the barrels of muskets, but bear in mind what you have just given them is equivalent to the gun on a Sherman!

Confession time:
I often undercoat CSA grey, then only paint anthing that isn't CS uniform
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sixsideddice
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« Reply #27 on: 01 June 2010, 06:11:36 PM »

Here are my personal findings:

As a complete newcomer pretty much to this scale, I have been listening closely to the better advice of others, and experimenting with both black and white undercoating for my Pendraken Miniatures.

I have found that for the Fantasy range, the black undercoating makes for great line definition (Skeletons, Dungeon Monsters, etc) and separates the colours in such a way as to augment the natural detail of the minis and makes them stand out that much more, and with minimal work needed by me to create a nice effect.

However, with my Jacobites, Marlborough Brits, and most importantly, my English Civil War armies; a white undercoating allows me not only to see what I`m painting, but really helps makes the finished colours that much brighter, which (at this small scale) is a great bonus... and makes the extra detail that much more special, and very worthwhile my spending the extra time on each piece.

Steve :-)
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