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Author Topic: What are you currently reading ?  (Read 273521 times)
pierre the shy
Major
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Posts: 635


« Reply #2580 on: 25 February 2018, 05:57:18 PM »

Looks like a fascinating read (an added dimension for me is that the ship that ended the voyage of the Emden in The Great War was also named .... HMAS Sydney!).

A very good read indeed.

The foremast of the original HMAS Sydney was preserved as a memorial in the 1930's and still stands there today: http://mosman1914-1918.net/project/blog/hmas-sydney-memorial-mast

Sailed past in when leaving Sydney harbour recently.

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"Bompsadaisy.......its enough to make you weep"
KTravlos
Major
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Posts: 677



WWW
« Reply #2581 on: 28 February 2018, 06:20:31 PM »

Finished Nick Lloyd's "Hundred Days: The End of the Great War". Highly recommended.
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kipt
Captain
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Posts: 390


« Reply #2582 on: 03 March 2018, 05:45:07 PM »

Finished "The Russian Army in the Great War; The Eastern Front, 1914-1917" by David Stone.

Very well done and needed when most books are about the Western Front.  I enjoyed it.
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fsn
General
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Posts: 7631



« Reply #2583 on: 03 March 2018, 07:32:41 PM »

Just bought "the Friendless Sky" by Alexander McKee; the story of WWI in the air. It's a classic that I have in paper form, but is well worth a re-read.

Something to listen to as I'm finishing my WWII Luftwaffe.

Though I have been listening to the Aeneid and am watching "In Search of the Trojan War" by Michael Wood - so I thought my next project would be bronze clad. Perhaps not.
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!
Orcs
Major General
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Posts: 3409

Thread Derailment Specialist


« Reply #2584 on: 03 March 2018, 10:26:41 PM »

Just finished "Panzer Gunner" by Bruno Friesen who served in Pz1V's and Jagdpanzer lV's on the eastern from.

Good read, especially the explanation about how to work out the range using the gun sight reticule.  The same reticule was used for both the main gun and the Co-ax machine gun. It had atwo position  switch for switching between AP shell setting and the one for HE shells and the MG as the baliistics for the MG was similar to that of the HE shell.

So when the main gun site is damaged as in Chain of Command this will also affect the accuracy of the co-ax MG. (Must buy a new anorak) Smiley

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My aim in life is to P*ss off one person a day.  Currently I am 3 years  1 month  and 23 days ahead of schedule.

The cynics are right nine times out of ten. -Mencken, H. L.

We are all above the line of normality. Its just we all draw the line at a different level
Womble67
Brigadier
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Posts: 2334



WWW
« Reply #2585 on: 04 March 2018, 10:57:18 AM »

Just finished "Panzer Gunner" by Bruno Friesen who served in Pz1V's and Jagdpanzer lV's on the eastern from.

Good read, especially the explanation about how to work out the range using the gun sight reticule.  The same reticule was used for both the main gun and the Co-ax machine gun. It had atwo position  switch for switching between AP shell setting and the one for HE shells and the MG as the baliistics for the MG was similar to that of the HE shell.

So when the main gun site is damaged as in Chain of Command this will also affect the accuracy of the co-ax MG. (Must buy a new anorak) Smiley



I love these little snippets of information

Take care

Andy
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lowlylowlycook
Captain
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Posts: 444


« Reply #2586 on: 11 March 2018, 11:03:05 PM »

Recently read "Amedeo: The True Story of an Italian's War in Abyssinia" by Sebastian O'Kelly

It's a biography of Amedeo Guillet, an Italian Cavalry officer that fought in Ethiopia in both 1935-36 and during WW2.  He fought with the Spahys of Libia and with a "bande", an irregular force of Ethiopians and Eritreans.  Sadly he never served with the Penne di Falco that I've converted models for. 

Amedeo had quite the adventure (charging British tanks on horseback is the least of it) so I could recommend this even to people not necessarily interested in Ethiopia or the East African campaign.   
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Leman
General
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Posts: 9196



« Reply #2587 on: 12 March 2018, 08:14:18 AM »

Reading Longstreet again prior to a campaign starting in April. It should be noted that the suggested 1861 starting army has two 6pdrs and a howitzer. 6pdrs play an important part in the early years of this excellent, full war, campaign system. Never understood why most ACW manufacturers always seem to produce the hardly ever used Whitworths and Armstrongs, but avoid the very common (1861-63) 6pdrs.
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The artist formerly known as Dour Puritan!
kipt
Captain
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Posts: 390


« Reply #2588 on: 13 March 2018, 12:16:20 AM »

Finished "The Bitter Years: MacArthur and Sutherland", by Paul Rogers.  Rogers was Sutherland's stenographer starting in the Philippines and went with him to Australia and back to the Philippines.  This is a continuation of "The Good Years".

The falling out between MacArthur and Sutherland came from Sutherland feeling his importance and wanting more.  There is a woman and adultery involved here, not condoned by MacArthur, that was ill concealed.  Also, Sutherland was the voice of MacArthur on trips to Washington DC as well as other senior conferences.

MacArthur recognized this but did not want to lose Sutherland, however they had a strained relationship when the invasion of the Philippines occurred.

The author, Paul Rogers, was in the HQ for the entire war, first as Sutherland's stenographer, and finally unofficially co-opted by MacArthur.  Rogers started as enlisted shortly before the war started, was promoted to sergeant, then warrant officer and then commissioned.  He never got to the front lines but came close on a jeep ride towards Manila prior to its capture.

Not a history but more of remembrances.  Good.
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fsn
General
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Posts: 7631



« Reply #2589 on: 13 March 2018, 07:40:41 AM »

Many, many years ago - 1981 - I was a student working in London. With my meagre allowance, I bought a book which changed my view on the world. I put my favourite bookmark in that book (yes, I have a favourite bookmark) and it engaged and entertained me on the tube into London.

One day, alas, the book fell from my pocket, or I left it on the train, or some light fingered magpie took a shine to my bookmark. Whatever, I lost the book, and the bookmark, never to be seen again.

What had me so captivated? Well until 1981 I knew that the Normans were ex-Viking who cut their hair, took to horseback and won a battle in Southern England in 1066. The book, The Normans in the South by John Julius Norwich opened the world of Italy and Sicily and Byzantium. I always liked the names of the sons of Tancred Hautvilles - William "Iron Arm"; Drogo (a wild name which obviously means cutting off a limb with an axe, backhanded) and Humphrey. One feels Humphrey may have been named by his mother.

Anyway, The Normans in the South is now available on the Kindle, and I have downloaded it. To be honest, I'm a little nervous. Will this be a joyous reuniting, or will it be more like hailing Jamie Carragher?
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!
Leman
General
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Posts: 9196



« Reply #2590 on: 13 March 2018, 10:56:48 AM »

As itís the same book, itís likely to be the spit of it.
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The artist formerly known as Dour Puritan!
Ithoriel
Lieutenant General
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Posts: 5600



« Reply #2591 on: 13 March 2018, 11:09:55 AM »

As itís the same book, itís likely to be the spit of it.

I have reread books that were a joy in my youth only to find that time and experience left me rather less impressed than of yore!
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Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!
FierceKitty
General
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Posts: 8288


Down south of the border....


« Reply #2592 on: 13 March 2018, 12:22:29 PM »

I have reread books that were a joy in my youth only to find that time and experience left me rather less impressed than of yore!

Getting old is less fun than one expects. Sad
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My opponents never play well. I was unlucky/the rules are unfair/I was off form/I felt sorry for him and let him win....
Leman
General
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Posts: 9196



« Reply #2593 on: 13 March 2018, 03:38:38 PM »

My back can confirm that, especially after a painting session.
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The artist formerly known as Dour Puritan!
kipt
Captain
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Posts: 390


« Reply #2594 on: 17 March 2018, 03:36:38 PM »

Finished "USN Battleship vs IJN Battleship: The Pacific 1942-44" by Mark Stile.  Typical Osprey with good pictures and illustrations.

Guadalcanal and Leyte Gulf were the only two actions between battleships in the Pacific.  The narrative is well written and I found the booklet to be very good.

We had just finished a GQIII WWI naval action so I moved this book up in my queue.
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