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| | |-+  Painting detail with Acrylic markers?
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Author Topic: Painting detail with Acrylic markers?  (Read 1605 times)
jimduncanuk
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« Reply #15 on: 24 November 2019, 11:56:47 PM »

Pens - itís the future and can save a huge amount of time as well. Iíve been using them for years. My daughter uses poska pens for her art work so I just nick hers. White for straps is bloody marvellous.

I 'borrowed' a Posca' pen from one of my daughters. The colour was quite vivid (light blue) but was susceptible to scratching. Not sure I'll change my method.
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John Cook
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« Reply #16 on: 27 November 2019, 12:45:02 PM »

I use sharpies quite a lot; they make life much easier.

I hadn't heard of these pens before.  Thanks for the tip.
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FierceKitty
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« Reply #17 on: 27 November 2019, 01:34:27 PM »

I hope you can get them. Remember I live in Bangkok.
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Techno
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« Reply #18 on: 27 November 2019, 05:42:57 PM »

Sharpies ?  Smiley

I use a fine tip one for marking brass rod to the length I need for 'whatever'.

Certainly available here in the UK.

Cheers - Phil
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Dr Dave
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« Reply #19 on: 27 November 2019, 07:00:06 PM »

I 'borrowed' a Posca' pen from one of my daughters. The colour was quite vivid (light blue) but was susceptible to scratching. Not sure I'll change my method.


I'm not sure about the robustness of them. I certainly use the white for straps etc.. but it's often "protected" from contact with the figure's arms and weapons plus I always matt varnish anyway.
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Orcs
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« Reply #20 on: 29 November 2019, 10:18:10 AM »

Ordered a Posca white and a brown, on the basis of the comments here. I will see how I get on 
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Bunny
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« Reply #21 on: 11 December 2019, 06:41:37 AM »

The POSKA Pens are there different nib sizes?  If so what is good for 10mm detail?
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Techno
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« Reply #22 on: 11 December 2019, 07:15:51 AM »

Though I'm not familiar with this particular brand, Bunny.....I'd guess that the finest nib size would be the one you'd require for '10mm' detail.
Having had a quick 'Google', that size would appear to be 0.7mm.

Though I don't use them for painting, (I use them to 'mark' brass rod etc) the uniPIN brand of markers would be even better for ultra fine detail, as they go down to 0.05mm nibs.

The 'disadvantage' is that I believe they only do the basic black, blue, green & red.......and the nibs being so fine, these tend to 'dry' very quickly while you're using them.....and you have to go and make a few 'squiggles' on a piece of paper before they 'flow' again.

Cheers - Phil
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steve_holmes_11
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« Reply #23 on: 11 December 2019, 09:12:49 AM »

I'm a little late to the party.

I tried using permanent markers about a decade back.
Added abbreviated named to tabs on naval mini bases.

Despite a covering clear varnish layer, the ink faded rather quickly.
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Dr Dave
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« Reply #24 on: 11 December 2019, 09:51:12 PM »

Inks are either suspensions of particles - carbon in the case of black, or dyes and so prone to fading. All permenant markers use dyes I think, and so will fade. Carbon is much more robust - like most black paints.
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