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Author Topic: BT email scam  (Read 355 times)
John Cook
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« on: 25 November 2019, 03:21:17 PM »

Got an email overnight from 'New Terms'  - email address Services <noreply-bounce-5dd99a7a42461@missariellesspeechroom.com>.  The page looks as if it come from BT and says:

"IMPORTANT NOTICE
Brexit is coming and your terms of service are changing. Here's what you need to know. When the United Kingdom leaves the European Union we will no longer be under the EU's General Data Protection Regulations. This means your contract terms must be updated to comply with our service. There is good news however, you monthly bill will remain unchanged. This includes all BT services.". 

It goes on "If you fail to update your new terms of service you may see a reduction in the quality your services." 

It invites you to click 'Accept' at which point what appears to be a genuine BT login page comes up.  Login in the usual way and you get a page with fields asking to confirm BT account number, name, address, telephone number etc., bank account details, and details of debit and credit cards, including their security numbers.  As there is no need for BT to know any of the card details the aroma of rat became overpowering.

I spoke to BT who confirmed this was a scam and I have also warned off my bank. 

This is a very convincing scam which uses what appear to be genuine BT pages.
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ianrs54
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« Reply #1 on: 25 November 2019, 04:01:21 PM »

AS always dont reply !!!

GDPR is our legislation - it's basically an updated of the 1999 DPA and WILL APPLY after we leave, although hopefully we wont !

IanS
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« Reply #2 on: 25 November 2019, 05:24:26 PM »

Good heads up, John.

Thanks.

Cheers - Phil  Smiley
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fred.
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« Reply #3 on: 25 November 2019, 07:43:28 PM »

If it was only after you clicked through a couple of pages it was suspicious, then I think you need to turn up your scepticism in regards to anything unexpected that comes through by email.

The source email address is odd, the wording is odd.
Scammers are getting very good at replicating logon pages. But URLs are always likely to be somewhat odd.

If you aren't sure about an email,  it is better to just search your provider (or type in their URL if you remember it) as a way of going to their website. Only click links in emails that you are very confident of their provenance.

I had a robo call early on Saturday morning - claimed to be from Amazon wanting me to renew my Prime. Was odd for several reasons, it was a robo call - Amazon do everything by email, the timing and amount both seemed a bit off too. I assume the scam would have been if I had pressed 1, then I would have ended up on some premium rate phone number. Certainly a new one on me. Caused me to double check my Amazon Prime settings - using the app.





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mollinary
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« Reply #4 on: 25 November 2019, 09:12:53 PM »

If it was only after you clicked through a couple of pages it was suspicious, then I think you need to turn up your scepticism in regards to anything unexpected that comes through by email.

The source email address is odd, the wording is odd.
Scammers are getting very good at replicating logon pages. But URLs are always likely to be somewhat odd.

If you aren't sure about an email,  it is better to just search your provider (or type in their URL if you remember it) as a way of going to their website. Only click links in emails that you are very confident of their provenance.

I had a robo call early on Saturday morning - claimed to be from Amazon wanting me to renew my Prime. Was odd for several reasons, it was a robo call - Amazon do everything by email, the timing and amount both seemed a bit off too. I assume the scam would have been if I had pressed 1, then I would have ended up on some premium rate phone number. Certainly a new one on me. Caused me to double check my Amazon Prime settings - using the app.

I have that robo call regularly, twice today!
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John Cook
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« Reply #5 on: 25 November 2019, 09:19:12 PM »

If it was only after you clicked through a couple of pages it was suspicious, then I think you need to turn up your scepticism in regards to anything unexpected that comes through by email.

The source email address is odd, the wording is odd.
Scammers are getting very good at replicating logon pages. But URLs are always likely to be somewhat odd.

If you aren't sure about an email,  it is better to just search your provider (or type in their URL if you remember it) as a way of going to their website. Only click links in emails that you are very confident of their provenance.

I had a robo call early on Saturday morning - claimed to be from Amazon wanting me to renew my Prime. Was odd for several reasons, it was a robo call - Amazon do everything by email, the timing and amount both seemed a bit off too. I assume the scam would have been if I had pressed 1, then I would have ended up on some premium rate phone number. Certainly a new one on me. Caused me to double check my Amazon Prime settings - using the app.







Thanks for the advice but don't you worry, my scepticism was turned up sufficiently high not to be taken in.  However, as a BT customer and shareholder it wasn't unexpected - it looked exactly like the email I receive every month with my billing details and periodically with shareholder offers.  It was clearly aimed at BT customers specifically but BT repeatedly tell customers that they will never ask for financial details by email so it was immediately suspicious.

The Amazon robo-call scam has been around for some time.  I must get a couple a week.  It is clearly aimed at Amazon Prime customers of which I'm not one, so it's just an irritation.

« Last Edit: 25 November 2019, 09:21:42 PM by John Cook » Logged
fred.
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« Reply #6 on: 25 November 2019, 10:50:31 PM »

The key thing is that you spotted something was wrong. When scammers are easily able to copy genuine emails it does make it hard to spot them.

Sounds like I have done well to avoid the Amazon robo caller for so long.
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« Reply #7 on: 26 November 2019, 08:30:10 AM »

Sounds like I have done well to avoid the Amazon robo caller for so long.

Same here, Forbes !

But then, I don't use Amazon Prime.....So it'd be a bit of a giveaway. Grin Grin

Cheers - Phil
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Heedless Horseman
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« Reply #8 on: 28 November 2019, 03:18:15 AM »

The BT scam is so obvious...'Brexit is coming'... no one could say this...Wishful thinking!. ('Winter Is Coming' but I am still waiting for the GOT DVD from Amazon! Lol.)
Amazon Prime call is a PIA...08.30 am yesterday! Did press to reply once...think Asian guy was so surprised that he didn't know what to say! Will have to have another chat with Donny T to see if he can do something...or maybe, not.  Wink
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John Cook
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« Reply #9 on: 28 November 2019, 12:51:29 PM »

The BT scam is so obvious...'Brexit is coming'... no one could say this...Wishful thinking!. ('Winter Is Coming' but I am still waiting for the GOT DVD from Amazon! Lol.)
Amazon Prime call is a PIA...08.30 am yesterday! Did press to reply once...think Asian guy was so surprised that he didn't know what to say! Will have to have another chat with Donny T to see if he can do something...or maybe, not.  Wink

Brexit certainly is coming, sooner or later. 

This scam is certainly the most convincing I've seen.  I'll bet my three pensions that hundreds of people fall for it.  If you are a BT customer it looks exactly like a BT email, complete with login page.  Where it fails is that, if you are a BT customer, you will have been told, many, many times that they will never ask for personal information via an email.  The simple rule with all these things, it seems to me, is never give personal details either by email or phone.  Call back the relevant provider, on a different phone, to check if needs be. 

I just had a call from 'Vodaphone' who wanted just that, but they couldn't even tell me what my account number was.  An obvious scam from the 1-o-clock Paki.
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