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| | |-+  The care & nurture of a 3d printer...
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Author Topic: The care & nurture of a 3d printer...  (Read 508 times)
Wulf
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« Reply #15 on: 11 March 2019, 10:15:48 PM »

I assume that while a model is printing, you can just leave the printer to it? Or does it need monitoring while its printing?
I watch the print until I'm confident it's adhering and will print. I just started another print and aborted it twice because I wasn't happy that every part was stuck down. Better to stop it after 5 minutes rather than let it fail after 5 hours... This 3rd time, it looks fine. I watched the first 1mm or so print. It'll now take about 8 more hours to print... I'll be going to bed soon, it may well finish in time before I go to work tomorrow morning at 7am...  After the first few prints, I've been confident enough to leave it running overnight & while I'm at work, so long as I see it off to a good start.

There is always, however, the possibility of a disaster, a bit comes loose from the print bed, or some support proves inadequate & the print just becomes a mess. But if that happened while you were watching you couldn't stop it anyway...
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fred.
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« Reply #16 on: 11 March 2019, 10:32:03 PM »

That makes sense.

Do you think you are getting a higher success rate now you have more experience, or is it still quite hit and miss?
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Wulf
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« Reply #17 on: 11 March 2019, 10:46:42 PM »

Do you think you are getting a higher success rate now you have more experience, or is it still quite hit and miss?
Definitely better, but now I'm experimenting more with even finer detail vs. speed - I don't want to take 6 hours to print one  10mm scale tank, but I do want the finest possible detail... - so I am getting failures caused by that. Right now I intend to test other Build Plate Adhesion methods, and increase the percentage of my support (10% is proving barely adequate). If I played it safe, or printed bigger things, I would be quite confident of success. I can, for instance, print buildings quite successfully so long as the walls aren't too thin, or scaled up 1:200 scale tanks (which look a bit chunky at 1:150).

Still having minor issues with stringing too, I'll have to dismantle my filament feed after this print & try and get it more precise.
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Westmarcher
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Sir Oik of Westmarch


« Reply #18 on: 12 March 2019, 10:24:40 AM »

I got lost when the Palestine Liberation Army got involved.   Confused

But keep up the good work, anyway, Wulf.  Thumbs up
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I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.
barbarian
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« Reply #19 on: 13 March 2019, 04:08:00 PM »

Played a bit with the printer (Creality) of a friend. The worst part is even the room temperature is a factor.
I think these entry level printers are no good to small scale like 10mm. Even 28 mm is rubbish on these.
I can see being used for scenery I guess.
Still need to test more and more.
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Wulf
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« Reply #20 on: 13 March 2019, 11:41:06 PM »

I think these entry level printers are no good to small scale like 10mm. Even 28 mm is rubbish on these.
It depends what you want and what you expect. I'm happily creating 10mm scale tanks to rival the detail level of cheaper metal & resin minis, but at a fraction of the cost of even those cheap ones. Yes, you certainly get visible surface layering & artefacts, but from gaming table ranges & angles those are negligible.
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Techno
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« Reply #21 on: 14 March 2019, 06:44:08 AM »

Sounds like, you pays your money and you take your choice. Smiley

If you're happy with what you're producing, Wulf....and I would be !... that's the 'main thing'.

Cheers - Phil
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Steve J
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« Reply #22 on: 14 March 2019, 07:11:48 AM »

I agree with Phil. I tend to look at a lot of this stuff from my professional modelmaking point of view, where it simply doesn't cut the mustard for most of the time. From a home point of view they are more than adequate, which is what really counts.
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Wulf
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« Reply #23 on: 15 March 2019, 08:27:05 PM »

If you really want to get into the 3d world you could have a look at getting some models from the 3D sketchup warehouse
Finally checked out Sketchup, and, while it's nice to have more options, as far as I can see these tanks don't come with separate turrets, which makes them considerably less useful to me. Very nice, but I'm hoping there are easier alternatives.
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