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Author Topic: Facebook: Friends of the Tank Museum  (Read 7942 times)
Ithoriel
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« Reply #90 on: 08 September 2019, 05:07:51 PM »

What will archaeologists and future historians and geologists think when they find these 10,000 years into the future?  Grin

What they always think when faced with the inexplicable ... "This is clearly a ritual site" Smiley
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Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!
fsn
General
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« Reply #91 on: 05 October 2019, 08:34:56 AM »




The A22 Churchill had been designed in haste, and early versions were notorious for mechanical problems. As a result, several replacement projects were considered, based on up-armored versions of the A27 Cromwell, then the best regarded of the British cruiser tanks available. The most viable – and the only one to make it off the drawing board – was the A33 Excelsior. This was essentially a Cromwell hull up-armoured to the same standard as the Churchill, but as the Cromwell suspension would be unable to take the increased weight, the first prototype used the suspension and tracks, The second prototype used widened Cromwell track and suspension, and different armoured side skirts. However, by this point many of the issues of the Churchill had been resolved, and the project was dropped. This is the second prototype, which survives at the Tank Museum
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
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15mm is dead. It just doesn't know it yet.
Raider4
Major
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« Reply #92 on: 05 October 2019, 12:26:30 PM »

What they always think when faced with the inexplicable ... "This is clearly a ritual site" Smiley

Ahh, Time Team at it's peak.
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fsn
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« Reply #93 on: 03 November 2019, 07:10:11 PM »




Two Churchill AVRE crewmen holding one of the 290mm demolition rounds fired by the AVRE's Petard gun. Intended to demolish bunkers and obstacles, the “flying dustbin” was a low velocity “Spigot Mortar” similar to a giant version of the infantry PIAT. It was loaded by breaking the barrel upwards like a shotgun and the new round upward through a sliding hatch that replaced one of the usual hull crew hatches. Postwar Churchill AVREs replaced the Petard with a more conventional 165mm gun
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!

15mm is dead. It just doesn't know it yet.
fsn
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« Reply #94 on: 03 November 2019, 07:19:51 PM »

From the Facebook Group "Royal Navy During WWII"

THE BRITISH NAVY AND FLEET AIR ARM COMBINE WITH US LANDING FORCES IN NORTH AFRICAN LANDINGS. 6-9 NOVEMBER 1942.
Seen from the bridge of HMS FORMIDABLE are HMS RENOWN, NELSON, DUKE OF YORK and VICTORIOUS.

That's two versions of the Seafire, and is that an Albacore?



THE ROYAL NAVY SUPPORTING ALLIED FORCES IN NORMANDY, JUNE 1944.
Starboard 4 inch guns of HMS BELFAST open fire on German positions around Ver-sur-Mer on the night of 27 June 1944.


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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!

15mm is dead. It just doesn't know it yet.
pierre the shy
Lieutenant Colonel
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« Reply #95 on: 04 November 2019, 05:53:55 PM »

From the Facebook Group "Royal Navy During WWII"

THE BRITISH NAVY AND FLEET AIR ARM COMBINE WITH US LANDING FORCES IN NORTH AFRICAN LANDINGS. 6-9 NOVEMBER 1942.
Seen from the bridge of HMS FORMIDABLE are HMS RENOWN, NELSON, DUKE OF YORK and VICTORIOUS.

That's two versions of the Seafire, and is that an Albacore?

Yes its an Albacore - if you look closely you can see the back of the canopy between the folded wings.

According to David Brown's "Carrier Operations of WW2" Formidable's air group for the Torch landings consisted of the following FAA units:

885 Squadron - 6 Seafire IIC
888 Squadron - 12 Martlet II
893 Squadron - 12 Martlet IV
820 Squadron - 12 Albacore

Martlet was the British name for the Grumman Wildcat.
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"this plan makes the Charge of the Light Brigade seem like a sensible military operation"
steve_holmes_11
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Posts: 544


« Reply #96 on: 04 November 2019, 06:24:36 PM »

Yes its an Albacore - if you look closely you can see the back of the canopy between the folded wings.

According to David Brown's "Carrier Operations of WW2" Formidable's air group for the Torch landings consisted of the following FAA units:

885 Squadron - 6 Seafire IIC
888 Squadron - 12 Martlet II
893 Squadron - 12 Martlet IV
820 Squadron - 12 Albacore

Martlet was the British name for the Grumman Wildcat.

By some accounts the Albacore was less popular than the Swordfish that it was intended to replace.

Given that it's a half squadron of Seafires, is it a sensible assumption that they were intended for a reconaissance role?
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pierre the shy
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Posts: 961



« Reply #97 on: 04 November 2019, 09:58:46 PM »

After battling through most of 1942 still being equipped with mainly Fulmars and Sea Hurricanes the FAA was keen to use their new Seafires starting out with Operation Torch. I think they would be in limited numbers due to it being their operational debut...but they were seen as 100% fighters.

Unfortunately due to their narrow track undercarrage Seafires had a very high attrition rate whenever flying off carriers from 1942 to 1950 (FR Mk 47's flew in the Korean War) but they were a superb fighter when in the air.
« Last Edit: 04 November 2019, 10:56:15 PM by pierre the shy » Logged

"this plan makes the Charge of the Light Brigade seem like a sensible military operation"
fsn
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« Reply #98 on: 22 November 2019, 10:42:55 PM »



Battle of Amiens. A dump of German artillery guns and howitzers captured by the British Fourth Army, 27 August 1918. One in foreground was captured by the Australian Corps (note a message scribbled on the barrel - "Captured by Anzac Corps. What about the Tanks?"). Those in the foreground are all 21 cm Mörser 16 heavy howitzers.

Creator: McLellan, David (Second Lieutenant) (Photographer).
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!

15mm is dead. It just doesn't know it yet.
fsn
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Posts: 8739



« Reply #99 on: 22 November 2019, 10:47:21 PM »



A British Mark IV female tank, captured and used by the Germans, blown up by a mine and destroyed by French artillery. North of Perthes, 2 October 1918.

Creator: French official photographer.
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Lord Oik of Runcorn
(You may refer to me as Milord Oik)

Oik of the Year 2013
Oik of the Year 2014
Prize for originality and 'having a go, bless him', 2015
3 votes in the 2016 Painting Competition!

15mm is dead. It just doesn't know it yet.
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